• My Store: Select Store
  • Change Store
  • 888-686-6673
    844-305-5023
    877-316-6673
Cart
Moore Brothers Blog

Moore Brothers Blog: restaurants

Kathryn's Rack of Lamb

Kathryn's Rack of Lamb

favorites Kathryn Schockor

Kathryn’s Rack of Lamb 2) 2-pound racks of lamb, trimmed 6) cloves of garlic, finely minced 2) tablespoons fresh rosemary leaves, finely minced 4) tablespoons extra virgin olive oil     Sea salt     Freshly ground black pepper Place the lamb racks fat side up on a large rimmed baking sheet. Combine the minced garlic and rosemary with the olive oil. Rub the garlic-rosemary mixture all over the lamb. Season with salt (to taste) and let stand at room temperature for 1 hour. Preheat the oven to 450°. Roast the lamb in the upper third of the oven for 25 minutes for medium-rare meat; 30 minutes for more well done meat. Transfer the lamb to a cutting board, tent loosely with foil, and let rest for 10 minutes. Carve the racks between the rib bones and transfer to plates. Season with black pepper, if desired, and serve immediately.

Miss Nancy's Shrimp & Grits

Miss Nancy's Shrimp & Grits

favorites Terry Moore

Miss Nancy’s Shrimp ‘n Grits I’m the luckiest guy in the world. Every husband says that, but I’m empirically correct—no one makes shrimp and grits like Bridget (except for her mother, Nancy, who wrote this recipe): Grits: 1 14-ounce can of chicken broth (or 1 and 3/4 cups homemade) 1 cup milk 1/2 tsp. salt 1 cup grits 3 ounces shredded cheddar cheese 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese 1/2 tsp. Louisiana hot sauce 1/4 tsp. ground black pepper Preparation: 1. Bring chicken broth, salt, milk and 1 1/3 cups of water to a boil. Stir in grits and reduce heat to low, cooking the grits until thick, approximately 10 minutes. 2. Stir in cheese, hot sauce and pepper until melted and incorporated. Remove from heat and plate, topped with shrimp mixture (below). Shrimp Mixture: 2 slices of bacon 2 tsp. vegetable oil 1-2 lbs. peeled and cleaned uncooked shrimp 1/2 cup chopped green onions 1/8 tsp. salt 2 gar

Sweet 'n Dry, explained by a winemaker

Sweet 'n Dry, explained by a winemaker

favorites Wil Franklin

Wil Franklin is a Moore Brothers alum, with the reputation as the finest producer in Humboldt County, California. He has given us permission to republish his pieces from The Courtier. One of the most perplexing characteristics of wine is “sweet vs. dry”. I have often heard friends say they don’t drink white wine because it’s too sweet, yet they like late harvest red Zinfandel that is sweet. Others tell me they don’t like red wine because it’s too dry, but then turn around and drink an even drier white wine. What’s at the root of these perplexing contradictions that keep some people from even considering half of all wines? Clearly the words dry and sweet mean different things to different people. To make all this more understandable, I’ll put on my winemaker’s hat and explain the actual, technical meanings behind the terms. First, dry does not mean the puckering sensation felt in the mouth when quaffing a high acid white wine – that’s tartness. Second, dry is not the tactile, chalk

If You Visit Barolo...

If You Visit Barolo...

favorites David Moore

In the tiny village of Serralunga (just about a kilometer from Sergio Germano's tiny winery,) is one of my favorite stops, Vinoteca Centro Storico. This wonderful little restaurant/wine bar is a favorite of winegrowers throughout Europe, noted for it's wonderful collection of Champagnes and local wines, as well as for its food.Alessio Cighetti is the proprietor, and I had a number of really good meals and conversations with him. I can't wait to get back to this beautiful small town, and this wonderful little restaurant. –DM

Frank Splane - On Italy

Frank Splane - On Italy

favorites Frank Splane

A recent layover in London gave me an opportunity to see an old friend and to visit a special shop where I planned to procure a few tasty gifts for the viticoltori I visit every year in Italy. Over the years, I’ve offered my hosts vino Americano, pancake mix (there’s no equivalent in France or Italy), Vermont maple syrup, Yankees baseball caps, and Bonny Doon T-shirts. But it had been a long time since I’d bought a wedge at Neal’s Yard Dairy in London, one of the planet’s finest cheese shops. Neal’s often pops into my mind whenever a new customer enters Moore Brothers for the first time. I’m reminded of my first visit to Neal’s… I was not then (nor am I now) a card-carrying cheese connoisseur. Indeed, au sujet de fromage, I usually defer to the expertise of Scott, Eric, or Kathryn. All I knew then was what I had heard: that Neal’s is a showcase of “farmhouse” British cheese, is scrupulous about the conservation of its goods, and is synonymous with quality. I looked around the

You are currently shopping in the store!

If you want to shop from one of our other locations shown below, your current shopping cart will be cleared - you may only shop and checkout from a single location at a time.

Don't Change Store

Select Your Location

If you’re already a Moore Brothers customer, please choose your store below. If you’ve never been to Moore Brothers Wine Company, please choose the store below which best suits your interests. Thank you for visiting!

New Jersey

(Just across the river from Philadelphia) for in-store pickup, or shipping within the State of New Jersey.

Delaware

For in-store pickup only.

New York

Our New York store has just opened in Industry City, a vibrant community of innovative companies in Brooklyn. We offer both in-store pickup or delivery.